Fire Prevention Awareness

Posted on Oct 1, 2023 in Main

From October 8th – October 14th is Fire Prevention Week!

Fire Prevention Week is observed each year during the week of October 9th in commemoration of the Great Chicago Fire, which began on October 8, 1871, and caused devastating damage. This horrific conflagration killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless, destroyed more than 17,400 structures, and burned more than 2,000 acres of land.

Employers should train workers about fire hazards in the workplace and about what to do in a fire emergency. If you want your workers to evacuate, you should train them on evacuation procedures. If you expect your workers to use fire fighting equipment, you should provide the appropriate equipment and train workers to use it safely. (See Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 1910 Subparts E and Subpart L; and Part 1926 Subparts C and Subpart F.)


FAQs

How do I evaluate my workplace to comply with HIOSH's evacuation standards?
The best way to protect yourself and others is to prepare for an emergency before it happens by doing a thorough assessment of the workplace. Think about possible emergency situations and evaluate your workplace to see if it is sufficiently prepared in the following areas: (1) design and construction requirements for exit routes, (2) create an Emergency Action Plan to organize employer and employee actions during workplace emergencies, (3) provide safe exit routes, and more if you visit osha.gov
How often should I inspect my firefighting equipment?
Firefighting equipment such as extinguishers, sprinkler systems, and hoses should be inspected at regular intervals as specified by relevant guidelines or manufacturers’ recommendations. Monthly visual checks and annual professional inspections are typically recommended. Read §1910.157 for more information.
What are common causes of workplace fires?
Common causes of workplace fires include electrical malfunctions, improper storage of flammable materials, smoking in prohibited areas, and malfunctioning equipment.

Resources

Visit osha.gov for more information on fire safety.

Visit osha.gov/etools/evacuation-plans-procedures on how to evaluate your workplace to comply with OSHA’s evacuation standards